dailyegham LAHORE: Indo-Pakistani band Josh has teamed up with renowned Dutch DJ, music producer Hardwell for its upcoming single. The duo of Coke Studio veterans Qurram Hussain and Rup Magon will release the song on Friday alongside another track that features VJ-singer Komal Rizvi.

Talking to The Express Tribune via Skype, band front man Hussain said Kama has been produced by Hardwell’s label Revealed Recordings. “The track will be a surprise for our fans and I am positive that it will break all our previous records,” he said. “This is the first time Hardwell has joined hands with a South Asian fusion band hence it will be a treat for lovers of Indian and Pakistani traditional music as well as electronic dance music aficionados.”

Hussain feels Kama has the potential to become a hit bigger than their previous songs Nasha Pyar Da and Josh Naal. Singing praises for his Dutch collaborator, he said Hardwell is one of the best DJs and everyone is familiar with his name. “He is excellent at what he does and is also a great human being,” he said. The singer-musician said what’s special about the upcoming dance number is that the DJ has himself made an appearance in it. “We have also finalised its video that was filmed in Montreal,” he added. DJ Domeno is also part of the collaboration in the capacity of a featuring artist.

Having already worked with names such as Priyanka Chopra, Nelly Furtado and Pitbull in the past, with Kama, the band will only add to its list of achievements.

Talking about the other release, a track sung alongside Rizvi, Hussain said the song is part of their Cornetto Pop Rock campaign. They recently performed with the fellow Coke Studio star at a concert in Lahore. “Komal Rizvi is an amazing performer. It is very difficult to match her energy levels. She is a whole different person on stage,” he maintained.

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Almost 16 years, four studio albums and countless awards later, Hussain looks back at his journey from working at a software development company to forming the band. “It always surprises people when they learn that I am an engineer by profession. I would work and produce music on the side.” Hussain said his career trajectory is an ideal example of how one can explore other career options and doing what they are passionate about.

“I think it’s important for everyone to realise that just because you’ve chosen a path for yourself, it doesn’t mean that you cannot explore other areas. My training of engineering and technology helped me tremendously in making music,” he added.

Offering condolences

Qurram said the recent assassination of qawwal Amjad Sabri broke his heart. “Not just me but the millions of overseas Pakistanis were shattered to hear of the murder,” he said, adding, “I have always tried to convince international artists to come to Pakistan. Such incidents only make life difficult for people like us.” Recalling memories of his several meetings with the slain qawwal, the vocalist said Sabri will live on with his renditions of iconic qawwalis such as Bhar Do Jholi and Tajdar-e-Haram.

Artists pay tribute to qawwali maestro Amjad Sabri

He urged the Pakistani government to take adequate security measures and ensure the safety of artists.